Category Archives: Wine Regions

DO Cariñena

Bodega Paniza  (Paniza, Zaragoza) Cariñena is located in the heart of the Ebro Valley. Its vineyards cover a total surface area of 14,388 hectares, which include several surrounding towns: Aguarón, Aladrén, Alfamén, Almonacid de la Sierra, Alpartir, Alpartir, Cariñena, Cosuenda, Encinacorba, Longares, Mezalocha, Muel, Paniza, Tosos  and Villanueva de Huerva. Nearly 1,540 wine growers tend directly to the vineyards, which are undisputedly the region’s main source of income. Cariñena occupies an exceptional geographic location as it’s located on the same transport route that connects the Ebro Valley to Spain’s Eastern coast. It is directly on the north-south route that structures the Aragonese territory. This geographical position makes it a strong connection between the Basque Country and the Region of Valencia. Moreover, due to its proximity to the French border, it’s also an area of great interest from the point of view of trade and cultural relations with Europe. The motorway.
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DO Montsant

Bodegas Sumarroca The D.O. Montsant wine appellation encompasses a land where, for many centuries, the surrounding countryside has blended seamlessly with growing grapes and where even the old vines, cared for as if they were real treasures, are the veritable pillars of the region’s history. PHILOSOPHY For 10 years, the D.O. Montsant and its member wineries – currently numbered at 57 wineries and 44 private labels – have been faced with a great challenge: that of carving a place for themselves in the competitive and demanding world of wine. It has been tough and it still is tough. In order to face this ongoing challenge, we know must remain true to a certain way of thinking. And in the Montsant winemaking region with 1,900 hectares of vineyard and a global production of 5 million bottles, we are true to high standards of quality and we firmly believe in our unique.
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DO Valle del Maule (Chile)

Bodegas Don Juan (Valle del Maule, Chile) Lucatoni Vineyards (Valle del Maule, Chile) Located 250 km (155 mi) south of Santiago, this traditional and long overlooked wine valley—the largest and one of the oldest—has attracted renewed and much-deserved attention of late. Old-bush, dry-farmed vineyards that predate the memories of those who tend them now produce exciting, naturally balanced field blends of Carignan, Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, and other yet to be identified varieties. Newer plantations include Merlot, Cabernet Franc, and Carmenere with bright acidity and juicy fruit. More info: http://www.winesofchile.org/chilean-wine/wine-regions/maule-valley/.
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DO Alentejo (Portugal)

Bodega Enoforum  (Reguengos de Monsaraz, Portugal) Alentejo is Portugal’s largest political region, encompassing about one-third of the country.  It’s also the least densely populated region in Portugal.  About 10 percent of Alentejo is devoted to vineyards.  Much of the rest is used for growing cereal grains and olives.  Alicante is located in southeastern Portugal, stretching from the River Tagus, north of the city of Portalegre, south to Serpa and the Algarve.  The area’s extreme climate has challenged winemakers for centuries; summer temperatures can reach well over 100 degrees Fahrenheit, and lack of rain is a chronic problem.  Fortunately, irrigation systems and updated harvesting and winemaking equipment are tipping the scales in favor of winemakers, and the quality of Alentejo wine is improving as modernization and innovation spread. The Alentejo has led the way in Portugal’s wine revolution. Aside from the many tourist attractions in the region (such as the towns.
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Vinos de la Tierra de Castilla La Mancha

Bodegas Mirabueno (Castilla La Mancha) From north to sourth and east to west, Castilla La Mancha is an excellent land for winemaking. Some of its regions have been called “the cellars of Europe”, and the quality of its wines is recognized universally, both for its cultivation of foreign and domestic grape varietals. The varietals of grape cultivated are Viura, Tempranillo, Chardonnay, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Aireén. Castilla La Mancha is composed of five regions, each with its own climates and topographies and thus different varieties of grape. Very deeply ingrained in the local customs, the vineywards have developed a local wine culture in which you can get to intimately know each winery and the land surrounding it. The ample modernization in the last third of the twentieth century has given birth to more than 600 brands of wines under the DO Tierra de Castilla designation, each with its own exceptional.
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DO Navarra

Bodegas Aroa  (Zurukoain, Navarra) Bodegas De Sarria  (Puente la Reina, Navarra) The diversity of climates and landscapes A key characteristic of the D.O. Navarra area is the extraordinary diversity of its climate and landscape wich spread across more than 100 kilometres lying between the area around Pamplona in the north and the Ebro river plain to the south. The fact is that Navarra enjoys an exceptional location, one which is practically unique in the Iberian Peninsula and is marked by the confluence of the Atlantic, Continental and Mediterranean climates. The proximity of the Bay of Biscay, the influence of the Pyrenees and the temperate incluence of the Ebro valley are all key factors in giving Navarra its unique range different climates. These climatic differences mark the Navarran landscape, where more than 11,500 hectares dedicated to the Designation of Origin are distributed across the different ecosystems and crop growing conditions: slopes; river.
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DO Rioja

Bodegas Martinez Lacuesta  (Haro, La Rioja) Bodegas Castillo de Sajazarra  (Sajazarra, La Rioja) Viñedos de Aldeanueva  (Aldeanueva del Ebro, La Rioja) Bodegas Sonsierra (San Vicente de la Sonsierra, La Rioja) Mediterranean wine culture was, in the Middle Ages, closely linked to the monastic life, as their major broadcasters were the monks. Rioja area is no exception and is proud that Gonzalo de Berceo, the first poet who wrote in the Romance language, the wine mentioned in the verses he wrote from his retreat in the Suso Monastery in San Millán de la Cogolla. The first document to make reference to protecting and ensuring the quality of Rioja wines dating from 1650, even before in 1102, King Sancho of Navarra legally recognized our prestigious wines. In 1787 was created the Royal Economic Society Rioja Growers, aimed at promoting the cultivation of vines, wine production and trade development. Already in the twentieth century,.
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